A Life of Her Own – FREE Dec 11th and 12th

LOHO_fullcover_R5 front onlypointing+hand+vintage+image+graphicsfairy2FREE for download as an ebook Friday Dec 11th – Saturday Dec 12th. Just in time for weekend reading. Includes all five stories below.

What happens when a single woman homesteader in Montana protects a dark secret, or when another is pursued by angry homesteader’s wives? I answer these questions and more in A Life of Her Own, my collection of five homestead women stories of suspense and imagination. Click below!

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Mrs. Andersson Gets Her Wish

Andersson R6Mrs. Andersson has it all.  Or does she? Her homesteader neighbors love her. Were it not for Mrs. Andersson Mirna might never have met dear Mr. Clawson, and Bertha might have gone to jail for trying to kill Sophie. Mrs. Andersson runs a lucrative business that keeps her occupied at odd hours. During hot Montana afternoons, she entertains her neighbors on the wraparound porch of her two-story house. She gives her comforting arms and soothing words to folks in distress, and never asks a prying question. She is fair-minded, doesn’t jump to conclusions, and never gossips. Her heart holds many secrets, including her own. There is one thing she doesn’t have, and can’t have. She’s not one to agonize what is. If you asked her outright she’d say- “Well, it certainly ain’t the end of the world, is it?”  But . . . maybe it is!

Mirna – A Life of Her Own

MIRNA_final_200x300After fleeing terrifying circumstances in Indiana, Mirna takes up a homestead in central Montana. Before long she crafts a new life that brings her both income and new friends, but she lives with the nagging fear that this could be shattered.

When danger does appear outside the door of her shack, she prepares herself. She is on her own except for Dog who lies at her feet, and the cocked rifle in her lap. What is out there beyond her flimsy walls? Will she be able to handle what comes through her door?

Sophie Writes From Montana

SOPHIE_cover_r4Sophie is a sophisticated, attractive young woman who lives in Chicago. She enjoys all the amenities of a big city – interesting and challenging job, museums, art galleries, concerts, libraries, smart shopping, the lakefront and even public transportation. Felix, an outstanding young lawyer, admires her, and may even want her for his wife. Still, she wants to take up a homestead in central Montana.

How can she fit into that hard life? Can she  build a shack, ride a horse, plough, plant and harvest her field, kill and cook chickens, dig a well, or milk a cow? She has no experience in any of these things. Yet she has the brave spirit of an explorer. If Felix will not be there to help her  . . . who will?  

Nora Takes A Chance

NORA_cover_r4“I am sixty-two years old…I am active yet and more active than most younger women, so please think of me as physically able to endure. I have the courage and determination, and I am sure if any other lone woman can do it, I can too.”

– From Montana Women Homesteaders: A Field of One’s Own

Nora, also sixty-two, is in serious trouble. Nora has left her conventional life “back East” to live free on Montana’s open plains. But maybe this time she has bitten off more than she can chew. As she rides alone toward Lewistown she talks to Maggie, her horse, in a “highfalutin” way to give herself some intellectual stimulation. Suddenly Maggie bucks her right into a crisis. How can she get herself out of this one she wonders?

Lizzie the Reluctant One

LIZZIE_R2v1What will become of lovely, gentle Lizzie from Bessarabia? At fourteen she was pushed away by her papa and sent with her unkind brother Adam to homestead in America.  Reared to believe that men are in charge, she submits to Adam’s rules and slaves in the fields alongside him without question. He hires her out when he doesn’t need her on the farm.

At seventeen, Adam gets her a job, in town, and she experiences freedom for the first time. It is a blow when, Adam retrieves her to tend to his growing family and his unstable wife. She is conflicted between her duty to her family and her need for independence. What will Lizzie do? Will she be able to break free of her brother’s oppressive control and make a life of her own?

. The printed copy of the collection is available for $7.95 for those who prefer to turn a book’s pages.

I welcome you and ask you for to write your unbiased review of the collection on my

A Life of Her Own covers wide territory, from the tense tale of the practical Mirna – A Life of Her Own, to the vivacious journalist in Sophie Writes from Montana who faces open and violent confrontation because she is single. Another  woman  in her sixties is the hero in Nora Takes a Chance. She leaves behind her family in Ohio to encounter risks greater than she could have imagined.  Lizzie the Reluctant One is bound by family and duty against her will. The compassionate catalyst of the community harbors a deep secret in Mrs. Andersson Gets Her Wish.

 Each of the five tales of pioneer women are about change and facing disadvantageous circumstances and danger.  The tales are inspired by lengthy research about the lives of  women homesteaders of the early 1900s in Montana and the Dakotas. As the grandchild of homesteaders, I am pleased to shine one more light on this important era in our American women’s history.

pointing+hand+vintage+image+graphicsfairy2Amazon sites, or leave a Comment below-

 

 

 

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A Life of Her Own

What happens when a single woman homesteader in Montana protects a dark secret, or when another is pursued by angry homesteader’s wives? I answer these questions and more in A Life of Her Own, a collection of five stories of suspense and imagination.

LOHO_fullcover_R5 front onlyA Life of Her Own covers wide territory, from the tense tale of the practical Mirna – A Life of Her Own, to the vivacious journalist in Sophie Writes from Montana who faces open and violent confrontation because she is single. Another  woman  in her sixties is the hero in Nora Takes a Chance. She leaves behind her family in Ohio to encounter risks greater than she could have imagined.  Lizzie the Reluctant One is bound by family and duty against her will. The compassionate catalyst of the community harbors a deep secret in Mrs. Andersson Gets Her Wish.

 Each of the five tales of pioneer women are about change and facing disadvantageous circumstances and danger.  The tales are inspired by lengthy research about the lives of  women homesteaders of the early 1900s in Montana and the Dakotas. As the grandchild of homesteaders, I am pleased to shine one more light on this important era in our American women’s history.

pointing+hand+vintage+image+graphicsfairy2Download A Life of Her Own as an ebook on Amazon Kindle for $2.99, or FREE if you have  Kindle Unlimited. The printed copy of the collection is available for $7.95 for those who prefer to turn a book’s pages.

I welcome you and ask you for to write your unbiased review of the collection on my Amazon sites, or leave a Comment below-

 

 

 

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Mrs. Andersson

Mrs. Andersson Gets Her Wish is the story of a widowed woman homesteader. Like the woman homesteaders in my previous short stories, she works tirelessly to be independent. At the same time she is stalwart soul of her community. Mrs. Andersson  supplies a liquid product that is much appreciated by many in those dreary days of hard toil, as well as in the dark, cold winters.

She fills out the final details of her life as if she anticipates moving her soul onto the next stage. She is a descendant of one of the families who sought to venture west to escape repression, and have a chance to make it in a new land. Her life impacts her whole community, in the form of her many acts of kindness. Her neighbors gather together to find that in so many ways she has touched and enriched each one of their lives.

This heroine story is the fifth of the collection of woman homesteader short stories to be published in time for before Christmas entitled A Life of Her Own. Together you will find that the stories are alike as colored glass in a mosaic . . . each with its own special shape and brilliant color.

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Download the ebook on Amazon Kindle for 99 cents or FREE on Kindle Unlimited.

 

 

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Lizzie the Reluctant One

Hello Friends!

My latest short story Lizzie the Reluctant One  has “arrived”. It is available now for 99 cents on Kindle. But if you can wait it will be free for 4 days starting Thursday October 1st to Sunday October 4th.

LIZZIE_R2v1What will become of lovely, gentle Lizzie from Bessarabia? At fourteen she was pushed away by her papa and sent with her unkind brother Adam to homestead in America. Reared to believe that men are in charge, she submits to Adam’s rules and slaves in the fields alongside him without question. He hires her out when he doesn’t need her on the farm.
At seventeen, Adam gets her a job, in town, and she experiences freedom for the first time. It is a blow when, Adam retrieves her to tend to his growing family and his unstable wife.

pointing+hand+vintage+image+graphicsfairy2 Buy ebook on Amazon Kindle for 99 cents or FREE on Kindle Unlimited. Write a review on Amazon and you could win a bound volume of the anthology of my 5 short stories, A Life of Her Own FREE.

Meanwhile you an can enjoy my first short story Mirna – A Life of Her Own FREE this Saturday and Sunday September 26-27th.

MIRNA_final_200x300Danger awaits Mirna outside the door of her homesteader’s shack in Montana. She is on her own except for Dog who lies near her feet . . . and the cocked rifle in her lap. Mirna is one among the more than 150,000 single women trying her luck in the West, living on land opened up by Abraham Lincoln’s 1862 Homestead Act. Alone, she faces fears of wild animals and men who don’t always behave as gentlemen. As dawn breaks, Dog begins a steady low growl. Is it the secret from her past that has come to threaten her safety? What is in store for her now?

pointing+hand+vintage+image+graphicsfairy2 Buy ebook on Amazon Kindle for 99 cents or FREE on Kindle Unlimited.

Just write me with your questions or comments!

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Where are the Native American tribes now?

The distribution of Western land mandated by the Homestead Acts resulted in a breakup of the cultural nucleus of Native Americans, and the accustomed lifestyle of many European immigrant homesteaders.The US Government’s theory was that if the land could be broken into small parcels every separate family would be more productive, and enjoy the benefits of ownership.

Montana homesteaders

Montana homesteaders

In fact for the immigrant homesteaders this produced a breakup of the type of community centered way of living they had followed for generations in Europe, which was to live in small towns and work the surrounding fields of the towns together.

Salish People

Salish Native Americans

 

 

Native Americans, the People, were wide-ranging hunters who also lived in large communities, but were forced to accept 640 acre plots for farming, to which they were unaccustomed.

The Salish were “reserved” a large part of the Bitterroot Valley, only to be later moved out of this land and replaced by homesteaders. They were then were moved to the Flathead Valley north of Missoula, where tribal members received 80 acre allotments, and forfeited the huge “reserved” federal lands in the Bitterroot Valley, which had been their ancestral home for centuries. The new “reserved” Flathead Valley land also was eventually privatized by homesteaders, some of whom coveted  even the small plots of  land the tribal members had individually acquired. Towns and merchant stores were built, and some of the Salish were encouraged to buy on credit. If they could not pay up they had to trade.They signed over their land allotments.

Where are the Native American tribes now? Today the Salish & Kootenai tribe’s reservation covers a large part of the lower Flathead Valley, but much of this land has become private agricultural property and homes. Only 23% of the population of Lake County, Montana is Native American.

The history of the West is tumultuous. It is difficult to comprehend the changes that took place in those years from 1862 to 1930. I was raised at the head of the Bitterroot Valley, part of that ancestral home of the Flathead Nation. Nearby my house, on the outskirts of Missoula, is a place where The People pitched their tepees. I was told that they had came down to the Valley from the surrounding mountains to spend the winter, and to dig for bitterroot. Those days are gone forever.

Have outside events radically changed your life? How does that compare to the radical changes in the West? I would love to hear your comments.

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Nora Takes a Chance – Survival

 FREE eBook from  January 23rd  to Saturday,  January 24th! Author Page

Some men hold the debatable position that they are more decisive than women. Whether that is true is an open question. I think women tend to see more  variables- not just the physical and intellectual, but the emotional and spiritual as well. Processing all of that feeling and extra information takes time, as the latter have to work their way through the heart, and the heart cannot be rushed. Introspection and feelings come first, and then correct action follows, as when Nora takes a chance.

It could be what scientists tell us- that the connections between two halves of a woman’s brain are stronger than in a man’s. Or it could be from years of practice being the primary caregiver for children up to early adulthood, perhaps the greatest challenge a person can face. So when a woman ruminates you can bet that all the threads of her decision come into play. It can be automatic once her mind is made up, but that faculty is famous for changing. Like in Billy Joel’s song “She’s Only a Woman to Me” 

AppaloosaSuppose you put yourself in a new place, where the scenery is very different from where you lived. Early frosts, suspicious strangers and skittish horses. People are different. They are laconic and tend to stay within themselves for a long time until you get to know them, and you them. The homestead work is very hard and the rewards tenuous at best. And just getting up on a freezing winter morning or after a sleepless sweltering summer night strains the body. Then there are so many rattlesnakes outside that you have to step lively to avoid them if you can’t see them.

On the other hand there is the morning sunrise, the stars and moon which are not often visible in cities. They light up the sky and bring such wonder and peacefulness that the air seems sweeter, the wildflowers fresher, the grain fields more graceful and the people more kindly. There is time for reflection that is so necessary for the soul.

It also seems that it is in a time of great difficulty when we are most alive to all our thoughts and senses. Nora in Nora Takes A Chance falls into that state of mind. How she unravels her predicament focuses her, and she takes decisive action to save herself.

Read about Nora. Here’s a link to Nora’s webpage and an excerpt so you can listen to her thoughts- judge for yourself whether she will make the right choices. I hope this New Year you make the right choices for you as well.

Nora Takes A Chance is available as an eBook for Kindles, PCs and smart phones. It is FREE on Friday Saturday January 23-24.

Sophie Writes from Montana and Mirna: A Life of Her Own and my full-length novel Lila are all available in Kindle editionLila can also be ordered in PRINT edition for those who much prefer turning a book’s pages.

 

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Homesteading 110 Years Ago

Fergus County Montana, where several of my stories take place, was once a focal point of the Socialist movement in response to the treatment of miners and other workers in Montana. The farmers had it no better. Here is an excerpt from the article  “The Farmer and Socialism”  from the Montana newspaper, Montana News, of December 07, 1904.

Montana News HeadlineQUOTE- “There is no class of our people that is so ruthlessly exploited and ruthlessly plundered as the farmer. None works harder than he, and none nets less returns for his labor and capital. After he has by grinding toil for weary months produced a crop of anything, the gamblers of the commercial world take his product and gamble with it until it finally reaches the hands of the consumer. . . . To the farmer’s lot falls all the toil, the expenses, and the losses occasioned by storms, drouths, frosts, blights, birds, animals, insects and numberless other causes, while the railroads, commission men, and the combines of all sorts that prey upon him are guaranteed their profits and charges, whatever happens.”

Although this article does not refer to the women who homesteaded, they faced all the same difficulties. A good number of them were single women who bravely “proved up” their claims. They are the inspiration of my stories. Women sod house plains I am now working on the short story Nora Takes A Chance.  A woman who is sixty-two years old meets with unexpected misfortune while riding her horse into Lewistown. My other short stories and my novel Lila are available in Print or eBook from Amazon or Lila in print from Barnes & Noble. May your New Year’s wishes all come true!                                                     – Mae

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